Video Transcripts

This is the transcript page for videos that appear on the BBC micro:bit website. Use the menu on the left to jump to the video transcript you want to view.

Transcript 1: Meet your micro:bit

VO: Is something new happening in your class?
Are there micro:bits everywhere you look?
STUDENT 1: I love it!
VO: Well, don’t worry – if you’ve got your BBC micro:bit but haven’t got started yet, it’s really easy to join in.
STUDENT 2: This is my micro:bit I like it because I can program it at home using my laptop.
STUDENT 1: It’s great cos you can write programs for it on the website.
STUDENT 3: And then you can put it on your micro:bit using a USB...
STUDENT 4: ...Or by using Bluetooth Low Energy connection
VO: When you first meet your BBC micro:bit it will look something like this:
(THE FRONT OF A MICRO:BIT IS SHOWN)
But whatever it looks like, your micro:bit has lots of brilliant features to help you connect and create. It has twenty five red LEDs - great for messages, simple animations and games.
Two buttons that you can program independently.
Lots of connectors, so you can add sensors or motors to your micro:bit and make it part of a bigger project.
(MICROBIT FLIPS OVER)
And on the back…
A USB connection, a reset button and a Bluetooth LE connection to flash programs to your micro:bit.
A connector for a battery pack and some really smart extras, like the built in compass and accelerometer. Which means there are loads of things you can make it do.
STUDENT 3: We programed our microbit to be a pencil case monitor.
STUDENT 4: If anyone touches it – I’ll know about it.
(STUDENT 3 MOVES THE PENCIL CASE ATTACHED TO A MICRO:BIT. THE MICRO:BIT SCROLLS 'OFF' ON ITS LEDS AND SHOWS AN 'X')

Back to top

Transcript 2: Teacher Registration

(A BOXY, BLACK AND WHITE TELEVISION IS SHOWN)
VO: In the 1980’s…
A TV looked like this!
(A BRICK-SIZED PHONE HANDSET IS SHOWN)
A mobile phone looked something like this:
And your PC might have looked a bit like….
(BBC MICRO COMPUTER IS SHOWN)
This!
This is the BBC Micro. In the 1980s the BBC inspired an entire generation of children to learn to code With the BBC Micro. Now we’re doing it again!
(RECORDING OF CHILDREN CHEERING IN FRONT OF A BBC MICRO)
VO: Welcome to the BBC micro:bit. Every 11 to 12 year old in the UK will receive their own BBC micro:bit.
A tiny device that they can program and customise with the help of the BBC micro:bit website.
And if you’re teacher, you can help your students get started! Just go to www.microbit.co.uk and explore our graphic and text based code editors, our lesson plans and project ideas and our videos and tutorials.
The website is free and anyone can use it to create code and program their BBC micro:bits, but as a teacher you can also create your own log in and have access to your scripts from any computer or device.
All you need to do is click sign in, then sign in with your chosen service, and enter your authorisation code.
You will only have to use this code once, to set yourself up – after this you can sign in with just your chosen authentication service.
That’s it! Your account is ready.
Now you can…
  • Access all your scripts from any computer or device
  • Share scripts with students and colleagues.
  • And Publish scripts to the micro:bit website
So, why not sign up now and help your class say hello to coding!

Back to top

Transcript 3: Parents

(A BOY IS HOLDING A CLAPBOARD IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA)
BOY 1: 3... 2... 1... Action!
VO: Parents! Are you ready for the BBC's most ambitious education initiative in 30 years? The BBC's new pocket-sized coding device, the micro:bit, has been sent to all Year 7 students across the UK to get kids to be creative with coding.
Maybe you have a budding film producer, footballer or astronaut on your hands; or maybe you have the next Steve Jobs or Martha Lane Fox.
PARENT 1: Well, when I was at school we had a BBC computer but I think we had, like, two in a school of 300 pupils!
BOY 1: My dad doesn't know much about technology...
PARENT 2: My knowledge of coding is non-existent, heh.
PARENT 3: I haven't go a clue what coding means...
PARENT 4: It feels like morse code or something like that. It weren't with pen and paper, it's all to do with computers.
VO: So, things are a bit different from when you were at school - but this is the future, after all... Isn't it?
PARENT 2: So my interests for Andrew would be that he has a good understanding of it.
PARENT 3: Everyone's got computers in their houses. They've got all sorts of games and technology.
PARENT 4: I think I'd compare [the micro:bit] to a Commodore 64, which is like one of the first computers I used to play with. I cannot just get my head around what that can do, what potential it has.
VO: The micro:bit is essentially a mini computer - which is really clever. But! Have you ever thought about how computers actually work? Surprisingly, it doesn't come down to magic - it comes down to coding.
Coding is basically a set of instructions that tells your computer what to do. It's what makes it possible for us to create computer software, games, apps and websites. All the things that we use every day.
(CHILD BLOWS WHISTLE)
BOY 2: Parents! Are you ready to code?
VO: There are four different editors you can use to code your micro:bit. Blocks, TouchDevelop, Code Kingdoms and Python.
GIRL: [To mother] The first step to coding is picking what type of code you want to write in. So, I'm choosing Blocks today and I like Blocks because it's simpler than typing in code.
VO: The Blocks editor is great for dragging and dropping your code.
GIRL: You just drag and drop from one side to the other. [She connects two blocks in the editor]
[Another child and his dad complete a section of Blocks code together]
VO: The TouchDevelop editor makes it easy to write code on a touch screen or by using your mouse.
You can use Code Kingdoms to program your BBC micro:bit using Javascript...
And for those looking to push their coding skills, try the text-based Python editor.
Don't worry though, you can always use the handy simulator to check your creations as you code.
GIRL: [To mother] So, if you click on 'Run' it will show you what you've done.
PARENT 1: [Ella's mum, Izzy, runs their code] Drumroll please... I wonder who the princess is?
[The simulator micro:bit scrolls 'Princess Izzy'] Izzy!
We'll see if this is actually a crown...
[A crown pattern appears] Oh, it is! It's a crown!
VO: Then, when you're ready, transfer your script onto your micro:bit and off you go!
[Andrew talks to his father, flashing his code to a micro:bit] ...And then you put that in there and it should hopefully work now...
[Andrew holds the micro:bit up to his dad to show him the LEDs] See? That's what you said... 'Hello'!
VO: Not only can you do fun simple stuff, like write your name in LEDs, but these little devices also have the potential to create some complex and exciting creations.
GIRL: [Ella uses the micro:bit as a steering wheel] Right now I'm driving a monster truck... controlled by the micro:bit.
BOY 1: [Andrew uses a micro:bit-controlled crane] If you move your hands that way, it makes it move.
PARENT 1: [Ella and her mum play a reaction game] It's quite good. 'Cause it must have a timer in it as well - they don't come on and off at the same time.
VO: With its Input Output rings, the micro:bit can be connected to a whole world of possibilities.
BOY 1: [Andrew controls a robot car by clapping] It's really good the way you clap and it just picks it up and starts moving.
PARENT 4: [Playing a ping pong ball bouncing game] The competition is to see who gets the most!
[She checks her micro:bit] Right, let's see - what score did I get here? Ten! That's really clever! And it'll stop any cheating, won't it?
You can't believe something so small can operate so many different things.
I dunno, I think it's gonna be amazing.
PARENT 2: I think I've got a better understanding of what it is and how it can be applied now.
PARENT 1: It's really simple to do quite innovative things. Ella's really good at it.
...Which I already knew, but I think I might be really good at it too.
GIRL: I'm very proud of her, it's been really fun to do it with her as well.
PARENT 2: You never know, he might turn out to be the next Bill Gates or Steve Jobs, hopefully! You never know.
VO: Maybe you're not as stuck in the past as you think you are - this coding malarkey really is as easy as it looks.
Check out the BBC micro:bit website for other useful videos to help you - and your kids - get started.

Back to top

Transcript 4: Mobile

VO: Are you getting creative with coding and want to code on the go?
Well, with the micro:bit mobile app you can code any time, anywhere.
Before you use your micro:bit mobile app, there are some important instructions to follow:
First, make sure your Bluetooth is on.
When your Bluetooth is on, your micro:bit gives off a unique name that can be seen by other devices up to 13 metres away.
Then, press the app to launch it. Go to 'Connections' and press 'Pair a new micro:bit'.
On your micro:bit press Button A and B together and hold them down.
Then, press and release the reset button at the back.
Your micro:bit will start to display the text 'PAIRING MODE'.
Then, it'll display a unique pattern.
Copy the pattern from your micro:bit to the grid on your mobile.
When your micro:bit shows an arrow, press the button it's pointing at.
Next up, your micro:bit will show you six numbers. Type them into the app on your phone.
When you see the tick sign, press and release the reset button, and you're done.
Now you just need to write some code, click 'Flash' and away you go.
There's so much you can use your mobile micro:bit app to do.
It's just like coding your computer but the best bit is you can code on the go - any time and anywhere.
You can use your mobile micro:bit app to invent games, raise an alert on your micro:bit when your phone's ringing...
And on some tablets and phones you can even code your micro:bit to take selfies.
Here is how to code your micro:bit to take a selfie from an Android phone.
Press 'Create Code', then decide which editor you'd like to use to start coding.
We're using Block Editor.
In 'Input', choose 'On Button A Pressed: Do'. Then, in 'Devices', choose 'Tell Camera To'.
Drop down the box, then select 'Launch Photo Mode'.
Then, in 'Input', select 'On Button B Pressed: Do'.
And then, in 'Devices', choose 'Tell Camera To Take Photo'.
Now you've created the code, press Download and open the file.
Click yes to flash the mobile with the micro:bit and that's all done.
So here goes: Press Button A to launch the camera mode on your mobile.
And then press Button B to take the photo.
MICRO:BIT: [Cheering children use micro:bit to take photo of cyclist] Selfie time! [We see the selfie snapped of the cyclist]
VO: Remember: if you have any problems with pairing or want to delete and previous connections
...Simply flash your micro:bit over your USB, and start again.
So get creative with coding on the go!

Back to top

Transcript 5: Python

VO: Are you having fun coding with your BBC micro:bit, and ready to take it to the next level?
Then take a look at the MicroPython Editor.
Okay, so first off let's explore the different parts of the editor.
Take a look at the buttons at the top:
If you click the My Scripts button, it'll show you a list of programs you've been working on.
The Download button saves a special .hex file on your computer.
Plug in your micro:bit, which shows up on your computer as USB storage.
Then, you drag the newly-saved file onto the device and your code will run.
The Snippets button is a cool way to avoid typing lots of code by using short cuts.
When a snippet is selected, MicroPython will automatically go back to the window and enter in the basics for some code...
...With sections highlighted in purple.
You can edit these purple sections with the code you need.
In the first section, you enter the first part of your code. Then hit the tab key to jump to the next purple section and type in the rest of your code.
So, now you know what those buttons do... it's time to code!
The name for your script is shown in the top of the right-hand side.
It's good to rename your script so you can easily recognise it.
The other part of the editor is known as the 'text window'.
And you can see that it already has written code.
It's the code you need to make your micro:bit say "Hello World!" Download it onto your micro:bit.
You can use this code to make your micro:bit scroll other messages - just write the text between the quotation marks.
And that's not all - you can write code to play games!
Here's how to write the code to play Spin the Bottle with your micro:bit.
BOY: [He looks at scrolling message on Spin the Bottle micro:bit] Dare!
VO: In the text window, you can see the code for "Hello World!" - you don't need it, so you can delete it.
Now you need to decide what your micro:bit Spin the Bottle game does.
In this script, it needs to do three things:
Be able to say 'Truth' or 'Dare'; reveal Truth or Dare randomly when we press button A...
...And just so we know the micro:bit is working, show a silly face.
So, we're going to code the phrases the micro:bit is going to use.
Type in a variable, which I will call 'truthdare'.
Now we have our variable, we need to define what's inside the variable.
truthdare = ['Truth', 'Dare',]
We need to tell what the micro:bit to do when it's turned on.
We start these instructions with 'while True:'.
We want the micro:bit to show a silly face when it's turned on.
display.show(Image.SILLY)
Afterwards, we need to tell the micro:bit what to do when we press the A button.
if button_a.is_pressed():
We're gonna tell it to clear the screen, pick randomly from Truth or Dare and scroll the result across the screen.
display.clear()
results = random.choice(truthdare)
display.scroll(results)
Great stuff! Now we want the micro:bit ready to be spun again - so we code it to wait one second and then display the silly face again.
sleep(1000)
display.show(Image.SILLY)
When you're finished, click download and drag the save file onto your micro:bit.
And that's it!
[Children play Spin the Bottle game. One presses the A button on the micro:bit]
BOY: Dare! [Girl does a chicken dance as a dare]
BOY 2: [Child presses the A button again] Dare... [Other children gasp]
[Boy tries to do the moonwalk for the dare. The other children laugh.]
VO: So don't you give it a go? And if you want to know more, then check out the editor documentation for some great getting started activities.

Back to top

Transcript 6: Block Editor

VO: Are you in a hurry to get coding?
Want to know the fast way to bring your BBC micro:bit to life?
Then this quick tour of the micro:bit Block Editor should soon put a smile on your face – or should that be on your micro:bit?
GIRL 1: I really like this editor because it is easy to use.
VO: From the micro:bit homepage go to Create Code – this is where you’ll find all the micro:bit code editors.
Choose the Block Editor and decide how you want to work.
New Project gives you a blank page to write your own script.
The editor will load and you’re ready to code!
The screen is divided into three main areas.
On the left are all the coding blocks. Just click on a category to see what’s in there – Basic blocks, LED, Images...
In the middle is a blank area for building your script.
On the right is a micro:bit simulator to test your programs out on.
And a row of command buttons along the top.
My Scripts will take you out of the editor and back on to your own page.
Run – click here to try out your program on the simulator.
Compile – you click here when you are happy with the program and you want to download it to your micro:bit.
And Convert – you click this to convert your Block script into a Touch Develop script and open it in another editor.
To create a simple scrolling message, click on basic and choose the 'show string' block.
You can change the message by clicking and typing inside the speech marks, or add an image to the end of your message.
Click on Images and drag the 'show image' block onto the 'show string' block.
Now click Images again and add the 'create image' block to the 'show image' block and click on the LEDs to create your image.
Don’t forget to press run to check your program works.
[The program runs on the virtual micro:bit]
Yes!
And when you are happy, have a look at the Getting Started videos to find out how to put your program onto your BBC micro:bit.
Smiley faces all round!

Back to top

Transcript 7: Touch Develop Editor

VO: Everyone's racing to get started with their BBC micro:bit.
So give yourself a head start with a quick sprint through the TouchDevelop code editor.
That should be enough to get the message across – well across your micro:bit anyway.
GIRL: I really like it because you can write programs for it on the micro:bit website.
VO: Go to the micro:bit website and go to Create Code.
This is where you'll find all the microbit code editors.
Choose the TouchDevelop editor, and decide how you want to work.
You can choose 'New Project' – to begin with a blank page and write your own program.
The TouchDevelop editor will load...
And you're ready to code!
The screen has:
A large coding area for writing your code.
A micro:bit simulator to test your programs.
And a row of command buttons along the top:
'My scripts' – will take you back to all your saved scripts.
'Run' – runs your program on the simulator.
'Compile'– you click here when you are happy with the program and you want to download it to your micro:bit.
And 'Undo' – you can click this to undo any changes you've made to the script.
GIRL: It's more creative and you can see the code that you’re making.
VO: This script has no instructions to tell the micro:bit what to do.
But you'll see a code keyboard at the bottom of the screen.
We can use this to choose from a library of commands and code.
We also get three new buttons, Cut, Copy and Paste – to help us edit our script.
GIRL 2: I like Touch Develop because it is easier to find the code that you need.
VO: We are going to tell our micro:bit to show a message when it is shaken.
So let's click on 'input' and choose the function 'on shake'.
Then click on 'add code' again and go to basic to find the function 'show string'.
If you can't find the function or command that you want, try the search box at the top of the screen.
Next, enter your message and tick to confirm.
To keep adding code click on the plus sign.
Let's add a simple animation!
Choose 'basic' and find the function 'show animation'.
Click on it to create and edit your design.
Fill in the LEDs and tick when you are happy.
Finally, let's tell the micro:bit to clear the screen at the end.
Go to 'basic' and click 'clear screen'!
Click 'run' – and let's see if it works.
Yes! Come on! There you go, it works! Congratulations!
Got the message?
Why not have a go yourself?
And when you are happy, check out the "Getting Started" videos to find out how to put your programs onto your BBC micro:bit.

Back to top

Transcript 8: Code Kingdoms Editor

VO: Are you in a hurry to have some fun with your BBC micro:bit?
Want to explore the world of code?
Then get on board for a whistle-stop tour of the Code Kingdoms JavaScript Editor and you could come out ahead of the game!
GIRL: I like using this editor because there are lots of things you can do on it...
BOY: ...And it’s really fun to use.
VO: On the Create Code page, choose Code Kingdoms and decide how you want to work.
Let’s try New project.
The editor will load.
And you’re ready to code!
The screen is divided into three main areas.
In the middle is the coding window – where you’ll create your script. On the left are libraries of code and tools to help you.
The first one is micro:bit.The commands in here tell your micro:bit to do something – like light up an LED, display a pattern… that sort of thing.
In Library, there are some really useful, ready-made, chunks of code, like the random number block…
Language helps you add loops and ‘if’ or ‘else’ conditions.
And Snippet lets you save or copy chunks of code to re-use.
The last tab is Tutorials – here you’ll find some step-by-step projects to get you started.
Over on the right is a micro:bit simulator to try your code out on.
GIRL: See if it works... [Student clicks on a virtual micro:bit]</p>
BOY: Three...
GIRL: Three. Yes, that works!
VO: And along the bottom… three important buttons and a slider.
My Scripts – this takes you out of the editor and back to your scripts.
Run – click here to test out your code on the simulator.
Compile – you click here when you are happy with your program and you want to download it to your micro:bit
The Slider! The slider lets you change the way you’re working – simple drag-and-drop blocks or steps towards text-based coding.
GIRL: I like the slider because you can see what code you have written as text.
[Student drags the slider to the right and the coding blocks on-screen become text.]
VO: Okay, time to have some fun. We’re going to turn our micro:bits into super dice. Only we won’t need to roll these dice!
In the coding window click on 'Add Event' and choose an event from the menu.
I’m going to operate my dice by pressing a button. I’ll choose 'onPressB'.
Now our micro:bit needs to know what we want it to do when we press button B.
We want it to give us a number each time we press the button, so go to micro:bit and drag the 'Say' block into the code window.
Finally, let’s tell it what to say.
Here we can use one of those ready-made bits of code. In the Library, click on 'Random Number'...
and drag it into the Say block.
Click the minimum number and click to add the numbers for our dice. Minimum number 1 and maximum 6.
Press run! And let’s see if it works…
Don’t forget to press the button!
[The B button on the virtual micro:bit is clicked.] Come on – lucky number six!
Yes!
GIRL: Let’s change it to 99!
Student enters '99' into 'Maximum Number' in the code.]
VO: Hah! You’ll never need a double six to finish first with this dice!
Go on - your turn!
You can check out the Getting Started videos to find out how to load your dice onto your micro:bit, or just keep playing.
GIRL: I made my micro:bit into a dice.

Back to top

Transcript 9: Get Connected

VO: Once you’ve seen how brilliant your programs look on the website, you’ll want to start showing them off on your micro:bit!
And the best news is – it’s really easy to do!
Click edit to open the program you want to download.
It doesn’t matter which code editor you’re using - just click the compile button on the top of the screen and wait!
Your script will be turned into a .hex file and downloaded to your computer.
So all you have to do is connect your micro:bit to the computer with the USB connector.
Your micro:bit will automatically show up as a USB storage device called MICROBIT.
Just click and drag the downloaded .hex file to that device.
The amber light will flash on the back of the micro:bit. When it stops, your program is loaded.
Re-connect your battery pack.
And press the reset button to run your program from the start!
GIRL: Yeah it’s worked.
Go on have a go!!
GIRL: I love it!

Back to top

Transcript 10: Getting Started

VO: What are you waiting for?
Let's get started!
You will need:
A PC, laptop, tablet or mobile device
And access to the internet.
Type www.microbit.co.uk into the address bar of your internet browser.
This is the microbit website – you will do all your coding from here.
Anyone can code or download programs on the website and there are lots of ideas and videos to get you started.
So, click Create Code to dive straight in!
Or check out the code editor videos, on the Getting Started page.
Ready, steady, code!

Back to top

Transcript 11: BBC micro:bit Trailer

BOY 1: In the future...
BOY 2: Hover shoes!
[Gasps]
BOY 1: ...click the button; hologram of your nan comes up!
GIRL 1: ...Shows you, like, a map in from of you.
GIRL 2: Inside the fabric... is WiFi!
BOY 1: WiFi!
BOY 2: Yes!
BOY 3: Yes...
GIRL 3 ...Oh yeah!
GIRL 2: ...That gives me an idea... You know the shoes?
BOY 2 & BOY 3: Trampolining shoes that'd hover!
GIRL 4: That is rubbish!
[Laughing]
In 2016, 1 million children will be given a BBC micro:bit to teach them to write code
BBC micro:bit - For writing the future

Back to top

Transcript 12: The Vamps deliver BBC micro:bits

The Vamps Meet the BBC micro:bit
[The Vamps walk down a hall of City of London Academy]
[In a classroom, they inspect a box of micro:bits]
BRADLEY: It's such a big part of culture and society, technology.
And it's creating so many jobs - this is gonna engage the brains of young people.
So I think it's brilliant, I think only good things can come from it.
TRISTAN: My friend does uni stuff for coding and I was quite interested in it, so I've started recently.
And it is fun! It's good, it's nice to actually just sit and do it.
CONNOR: People underestimate how many things we use these days that care created by code. Websites, anything. Twitter, Facebook, apps, anything.
It's created originally from code. And things like this, the simple basics and it turns into... flashing lights! It's cool.
[The Vamps high-five a row of students]
BRADLEY: [To the students] What do you like about coding?
STUDENT: When you're playing a game, if you think about how the game is made in general, you're using codes to make it. On websites you're using codes to make that as well.
[The Vamps and the students take a remote selfie together using a micro:bit] EVERYBODY: Cheese!
[The Vamps enter a Year 7 Assembly with boxes of micro:bits]
BRADLEY: [To Students] So we're The Vamps - nice to meet you!
Today, we are going to show you these - these are called micro:bits - so you can learn to code using these.
Today, we're gonna give you, every single one of you, one of these micro:bits.
[The Vamps hand out the micro:bits to the students.]
BRADLEY: See these little lights on the front here? You can program them to do whatever you want.
You wanna put your name in it, you wanna put a smiley face in it... you can do whatever you want.
It's so, like, open to interpretation; you can do whatever you want with it, so it's going to be really exciting.
What are this generation of kids going to do with this - it's gonna inspire a lot of people.
[Students connect their micro:bits to computers and start their first steps coding]
STUDENT: Oooh, that's cool!

Back to top

Transcript 13: The Voice Main Page

WILL.I.AM: So BBC micro:bit I think is an amazing program to get young kids into coding.
It's teaching you basics at an early age.
I wish we had this programme when I was growing up.
'Cus then I'd be, like, The Coding Wizard by now!
And so kids from 11 to 12 can start right now with the BBC micro:bit.
And this is awesome for kids!

Back to top

Transcript 14: Will.i.am's challenge

WILL.I.AM: This little chip here can be anything you put your mind to.
Literally! You can make this into...
...A music device, or you can turn it into, like, a beat machine. You can use it to control a remote-control car...
You can do whatever it is you put your mind to with this little thing!
First you're a beginner, next level up you're making computers!

Back to top

Transcript 15: The Big Food Survey Main Page

JB: Hey, I'm JB Gill, popstar-turned-farmer and figurehead for The Big Food Survey.
MUSIC: "Everybody in Love" by JLS
JB: Today, I'm at Oasis Academy in Salford, learning all about The Big Food Survey and how I can get involved, using this. [He holds up a BBC micro:bit]
In the Autumn we'll be asking you to take part in The Big Food Survey, which is an exciting project asking all about your eating habits.
But we need your help to create it!
[JB approaches a computer classroom and looks inside]
This is the class that's gonna show me what to do.
They all look a bit clever, don't they? Hopefully I'll be alright.
[JB enters the classroom] How're you doing?
TEACHER: [To class] Okay guys, this is JB, he's come to talk to us about The Big Food Survey.
JB: Well, hello everybody!
CLASS: Hi!
JB: As you all know, I'm here to talk about The Big Food Survey and I'm gonna need all your questions to help me out. Is that ok?
CLASS: Yeah!
[Pairs of students are writing questions together]
STUDENT 1: I've got a question for you, JB: As you are a farmer, when you raise animals, how do you feel when they have to be... eaten?
JB: To be honest, a lot of people always get a bit funny around that subject.
But for me, there's nothing better than having fresh farm produce.
STUDENT 2: What food did you eat yesterday?
STUDENT 3: What is your favourite restaurant?
STUDENT 4: How do you feel about organic foods?
STUDENT 5: What advice would you have for your younger self?
JB: I probably would have encouraged my younger self to eat more vegetables - I wasn't a huge fan of vegetables... Brussels sprouts...
I like them a bit more now. That's a good question, well done!
What amazing question would YOU ask? And how would you bring it to life using your micro:bit?
[To student] I've got my micro:bit, will you show my how to program it?
STUDENT 6: So first of all, we're going to use Block Editor because it's the easiest way to do it.
[An 'On A+B Pressed' block is shown on-screen]
JB: I need all the help I can get, so that's good!
STUDENT 6: Drag 'Show String'...
[A 'Show String' block is attached to the code]
...And then you can press this and write your name in.
JB: Okay, cool. [He types his name into the Show String textbox].
STUDENT 6: Then press 'Compile'
[The Compile button is clicked on-screen]
JB: And that turns it into a file that can go onto my micro:bit, right?
[JB drags the file to the MICROBIT drive on the computer]
Press A and B... ['JB Gill' scrolls across the micro:bit] Cool, there you go! I'm a pro now, brilliant!
So now I've written my name, I can use this to write my questions as well?
STUDENT 6: Yeah. And you can also put images in - and animations.
JB: To make it a bit more interesting! Brilliant!
[To class] I hope you all had fun doing The Big Food Survey and I'll see you guys soon. See ya!
CLASS: Bye!
[JB leaves the classroom]
JB: Well that was fun! And it was so easy to do!
Now, if I can do it, so can you - so pick up your micro:bit and get involved in The Big Food Survey.

Back to top

Transcript 16: BBC micro:bit MusicFest Main Page

BRADLEY Hey, we're The Vamps and we can't wait to headline the mini micro:bit Music Festival.
JAMES: We'd love for you to join in and try coding your favourite tunes...
TRISTAN: ...On the micro:bit!
JAMES: Oh yeah!
BRADLEY Absolutely.
TRISTAN: Yeah!

Back to top

Transcript 17: Ashley Roberts Big Food Survey Intro

ASHLEY: Hi I'm Ashley Roberts and I'm here to tell you about the Big Food Survey.
MUSIC: Pussycat Dolls - When I Grow Up
[A dancing man animation is shown on the BBC micro:bit]
[Ashley and a group of children dance along with the animation]
ASHLEY: Are you fed up of adults assuming that all kids live on is fizzy drinks and sweets?
That you actually eat more fruit and veg than maybe they realise?
Or, are you the kind of person that eats pizza all day long if you can get away with it?
Well it's time to find out the truth - the whole truth - but we need your help to do it.
GIRL: Hang on, what did you have?
Ashley: I had scrambled eggs and avocado - it was a very balanced breakfast.
GIRL: No it's not, it's disgusting.
GIRL 2: Yeah.
ASHLEY: Uh, it's delicious?
Girl: No it's not.
ASHLEY: During the week of October 3rd, we're asking all micro:bit owners to take part in the UK's biggest food and drink survey of its kind.
There's a twist though - you won't be answering to your teachers or your parents but to your micro:bit.
GIRL: Where did you eat your fruit and where did you eat your vegetables?
ASHLEY: We're asking you to tell your micro:bit everything you've eaten, drank and snacked on over the course of one day.
So we can reveal - for the first time - what the real eating habits are of 12 to 13-year-olds.
So get involved because we can't do it without you.
ASHLEY: [Using the survey] Ooh, I got a little check mark. I'm doing good, aren't I?
GIRL: Eh, 50-50.
GIRL 2: No.
[They all laugh]

Back to top

Transcript 18: How To Use The Big Food Survey

Voice Over by JB Gill
So you're interested in doing the Big Food Survey but not 100% sure how it all works.
It's pretty straightforward, but always worth seeing it in action before you get started.
I'm going to talk you through how to answer your first question and how to navigate the survey.
When you turn on your micro:bit in the morning, you will be greeted with a flashing question mark.
The flashing question marks mean the micro:bit wants to ask you a question.
To activate the question, press Button B to select.
Then, you'll see a time of day animation:
Rising sun for breakfast, full sun for midday meal and moon and stars for evening meal.
First, you'll be asked if you've eaten.
Scroll through options yes or no by pressing Button A... Like this.
[The A button is pressed in the on-screen micro:bit demonstration]
[The scrolling message switches from Yes to No and back.]
Scroll to the answer you want with the A Button.
And press Button B to select.
You'll see a confirmation tick.
If you answered yes to the first question, you'll be asked two to three more questions about that meal.
Some questions have yes or no answers, others have more options for you to select.
Such as: "What was it?"
This question has several possible answers.
You can scroll between them using the A button... and once you find the answer you want, press the B Button to select it.
Again, you'll see the confirmation tick.
If you miss a question, you can shake your micro:bit to take you back to the beginning of the question.
You'll see the time of day animation again, then the question will repeat.
Don't forget, you'll repeat the same process at each mealtime, so keep checking your micro:bit for the flashing question mark.
The rest of the time you can keep track of any snacks or drinks you've had between meals.
You'll see a symbol of a steaming mug for entering drinks, and you can swap between this and the munching mouth for entering snacks by pressing the A Button.
Select the one you want by pressing Button B.
I'm going to enter a drink.
You'll be asked what drink you had.
Press Button A to scroll through the list of options and press the B Button to select the drink you had.
The list might seem quite long, but once you know the option you want, you can speed things up by pressing the A Button the correct number of times until you reach it.
I know that "Juice" is Option 4, so I need to press the A Button 3 times, then press the B Button to select.
You can do the same thing for snacks.
When you've completed the Survey after your evening meal, you will see a message thanking you and asking you if you enjoyed the survey.
Then, you will unlock the hidden game.
And that's it! Pretty simple after all, huh?
All you need to do now is the final step of plugging your BBC micro:bit in, and uploading your results.
Don't worry though, all that information is on the website right here.
Thanks for watching, and good luck!

Back to top

Transcript 19: The Dumping Ground tries The Big Food Survey

ANNABELLE: From the first week of October The Big Food Survey is coming to your school. So grab your micro:bit and get involved.
The video cuts between Annabelle, Joe, Mia, Kia and Miles all trying The Big Food Survey on their micro:bits]
JOE: Are... you...
MIA: Have you eaten? Yes.
JOE: ...a girl? Am I a girl?
ANNABELLE: This is so cool! Yes, I am a girl!
MIA: When you see a question mark, you select... press B.
MILES: ...Breakfast. Yes.
ANNABELLE: Cereal? No... Cooked! It was cooked. This is so much fun!
MIA: Bread?!
JOE: It's A to scroll, is it?
MIA: Bread... I had toast.
KIA: I feel like I'm getting the hang of this.
MILES: Eaten? Yeah, I did eat at lunch. Yeah. A massive yes. That's a tick. Heheh.
KIA: Fruit. ...Any fruit?
MILES: I had, uh, naan (bread) at lunch.
KIA: So I shake it to reset it, right?
ANNABELLE: With... with friends? It was with friends! We had Mia over! Yes. This is really satisfying.
KIA: I'm actually getting it! Ah...
MIA: Oooh, I got a smiley face.
KIA: Ugh, jinxed it. [She shakes the micro:bit]
ANNABELLE: In front of the TV? It was! Wow! It can read my mind!
MIA: [Looks over to Joe] What? What are you doing?
JOE: A game.
MIA: What?!
JOE: I completed the survey and it's playing a game with me now and I've just figured out the controls. So... I'm enjoying myself a bit. Probably a bit too much.
MIA: Game Over... It's so clever.
JOE: Yeah. It's intuitive as well. Once you get the hang of it, it's like, really easy to understand.
I've still got the game going. [They both laugh]
ANNABELLE: That was really fun - I feel like I've really got to know it and its got to know me. So, um, yeah. Like a little pal
[She holds up the micro:bit to the camera] Really good fun.

Back to top

Transcript 20: The Dumping Ground Behind the Scenes

MILES: This is the set of The Dumping Ground - this is where we do all of our scenes and our filming - and where we chill out as well.
ANNABELLE: Good morning! It's 8 o'clock and I'm needed on set in 10 minutes. But first I'm hungry so I'm gonna grab some breakfast.
[She put a slightly burnt sausage onto her plate]
I like it - a kind of rustic sausage.
[She progresses down the trays of food in the canteen]
I'm a bit funny with bacon. I really wanna like tomatoes but I don't like tomatoes so basically...
Scrambled eggs - too much in the morning. Mushrooms - again, it's a step too far.
Beans - they're fine. [She presents a plate of a single sausage and some baked beans] And to me that's a perfect breakfast!
KIA: The girls all live in one house and the boys all live in one house.
MIA: Me and Amy, who plays Carmen, used to... obviously we're turning up, getting our breakfast, getting our hair done, getting changed... brush our teeth when we get here - 'cause we've just eaten breakfast - so we used to literally just roll out of bed, straight in the taxi. Still in our pyjamas.
KIA: With the food on set, we are told - most of the time - not to eat it.
JOE: ...Most of the time [laughs]
KIA: But we'll always eat it and we'll always end up feeling sick because you'll have to eat it over and over and over again.
JOE: And you'll have to get it, like, at the right times - if you eat, if you take a bite at a certain part... So, for example if you take a bite when someone says a certain line, then you'll have to make sure that you take a bit at that same part throughout the rest of the scene.
MIA: Every time.
JOE: And it is all real food, it's not, like, plastic or anything [laughs]
MIA: Yeah it is all real food.
KIA: In every single scene when I was 12, I had a biscuit in my hand. Every single scene. They used to get Nutella or a chocolate bar and melt it and smear it all over my face. There are so many scenes where I am just covered in chocolate, with like, a biscuit in each hand loving my life. [chuckles]
MILES: Tyler's diet isn't, um, very good. In the storyline he seems to think he's quite overweight, so in one of the storylines he goes back and he tries to count his calories but he only does it in sweets. He doesn't quite get the idea of what sort of things he needs to eat, like fruit and veg and stuff like that. I don't think he's very aware of the sort of foods that he needs to eat. Um, but I mean, he's fine.
MIA: Oh we've had to have some weird things.
JOE: I like, um, a deep-fried jam sandwich I had once. Or there's some-
MIA: Oh there's that scene we did where, um, we had to like, make the sandwich and there was like, Marmite, pickles...
JOE: It was every... literally everything you could find in your kitchen.
MIA: ...Cheese, ketchup... Absolutely everything. And then Tee... didn't Tee eat it in the end?
JOE: Yeah, something like that.
MIA: Yeah.
DIRECTOR: And cut!
[Annabelle is leaving the studio]
ANNABELLE: Bye! See ya!

Back to top

Transcript 21: The Dumping Ground's Food Secrets

ANNABELLE: I'm Annabelle Davis and I play Sasha Bellman on The Dumping Ground. I'm really, really boring with food actually. I like everything to be plain. My favourite food is pasta. Any kind of pasta I'm cool with. I'm basically half-Italian.
I'm really torn today between the pasta bolognese and the chicken and chorizo.
[Annabelle has a plate with plain pasta and the sauce on the side] This is a classic Annabelle meal going on here.
MIA: She's obsessed with pasta, but is has to be plain. Nothing else on it. Very odd.
JOE: I'm Joe, I play Johnny Taylor on The Dumping Ground.
MIA: And I'm Mia, I play Tee Taylor on The Dumping Ground.
I'm a newly-formed vegetarian. It's actually really hard to be a vegetarian because... I just love chicken. A lot.
JOE: It's a really good idea.
MIA: Yep. But I'm working really hard at it. [laughs]
MIA: I've got fries... and tuna.
JOE: See how well the vegetarianism's going?
MIA: [laughs] Well... I just really like fish. So... I'm now a pescatarian.
[Kia walks past, slapping Mia on the forehead]
MIA: Ow!
KIA: My name is Kia Pegg and I play Jodie Jackson in The Dumping Ground. I love fried chicken. [chuckles] That's it, really. All my receipts I hand in for expenses are chicken sandwiches or fried chicken.
MILES: I'm Miles Butler-Heaton and I play Tyler Lewis on the Dumping Ground. Well, I'm a vegan... so I like to have, like, vegetable curries and stuff like that. Just to - it fills me up and stuff. I like that sort of stuff.
KIA: There is a lot of food requirement here - a lot of allergies, a lot of vegans, vegetarians, pescatarians, all sorts. So it's always hilarious ordering food like "I can't have that, I can't have this, that's got dairy in it!" So it takes a good hour to get our food ordered. And then when we all get our food - silence descends for like, 10 minutes of pure, just like "Ah. Finally." And then we all just sit and chat and it's the nicest time.
ANNABELLE: Your evening dinner is basically where the family comes together and talks about the day. We do that, but I mean half the time I've eaten on set. And you get Harrison's school day, which is either great... well, often great. And you get what Dad's done and where he's been and then mum and Sherlock occasionaly - he's our dog - and he pipes up.
MIA: Like you say, I do love, like, dinner with all the family, like at Christmas time.
JOE: Yeah.
MIA: But then I love, like, to have a movie day with like, some ice cream or something. Watching a film.
JOE: Mm.
MIA: That's cool too. [Laughs]

Back to top